Month: July 2017

History of Antibiotic Adaptation Influences Microbial Evolutionary Dynamics During Subsequent Treatment

Antibiotic resistance is a growing healthcare concern whereby bacterial infections are increasingly difficult to eradicate due to their ability to survive antibiotic treatments [1]. There have been reported cases of resistance for nearly every antibiotic we have available [2]. Coupled with the fact that the antibiotic discovery pipeline has slowed over the past few decades [3], there is a dire need to find better treatment strategies using existing antibiotics that can slow or even reverse the development of resistance.

High-Throughput Assay for the Identification of Compounds Regulating Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

Osteoporosis and other bone-related disorders represent a major public health threat. One out of every two women and one in four men, aged 50 or older, is expected to develop an osteoporosis-related fracture in their lifetime [1], [2], [3]. There is a huge demand for products enhancing bone regeneration. Therefore, the last decade was denominated the bone and joint decade by the World Health Authority.

Powering Wearable Microelectronics

Wearable low power biometric devices and body sensor network systems (BSNs) such as heart, respiration, and activity monitors are popular devices that are predicted to increase tenfold by 2018. This project focused on biomechanical energy harvesting from rib cage expansion using piezoelectric materials and frequency up conversion to power wearable microelectronics.

B. thetaiotaomicron in the Presence of Yogurt

The microbiome of humans contains an estimated 100 trillion microbial cells as well as an estimated quadrillion viruses. It is responsible for energy harvest, the breakdown of indigestible carbohydrates, the production of important biological molecules, and, most importantly, proper immune system development.

Hierarchical patterning modes orchestrate hair follicle morphogenesis

Diverse structures, such as the skeletal elements of the limb, rugae of the palate, cartilaginous rings of the trachea, intestinal villi, and feathers, scales, or hair follicles, develop in a periodically patterned manner. Although many specific models to explain the spontaneous emergence of such repeating patterns in embryonic tissues have been proposed [1], these can be grouped into 2 general classes (Fig 1A). The first class, based on the Turing reaction–diffusion system, relies on the operation of 2 opposing signalling processes: an activator, which is self-enhancing and has a limited spatial range, coupled with the production of an inhibitor with a greater spatial range.

The Future of Disease Diagnosis

MIT researchers have devised a new, non-invasive technique to determine cell stiffness and thus reveal disease.

Health Disparities and Clinical Trial Recruitment: Is There a Duty to Tweet?

While it is well known that the homogeneity of clinical trial participants often threatens the goal of attaining generalizable knowledge, researchers often cite issues with recruitment, including a lack of interest from participants, shortages of resources, or difficulty accessing particular populations, to explain the lack of diversity within sampling. It is proposed that social media might provide an opportunity to overcome these obstacles through affordable, targeted recruitment advertisements or messages.

Diabetes – Under the Scalpel

Recent estimates by the International Diabetes Federation and World Health Organization suggest that currently there are 415 people around the world with the disease. This may climb to 650 million by 2040.

Haloquadratum walsbyi : Limited Diversity in a Global Pond

First described in 1980 [1], the square haloarchaeon, Haloquadratum walsbyi, is commonly the dominant species found in hypersaline waters such as salt lakes and saltern crystallizer ponds [2], [3]. Its cells are highly distinctive, being thin squares or rectangles, usually containing gas vesicles and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHA) granules [4], [5]. It thrives at saturating salt concentrations, where it can represent ≥80% of the microbial population [6], and its cytoplasm is completely adapted to function optimally at similarly high levels of potassium chloride.

Creating Advanced Body Armor by Combining Web Geometry with Shear Thickening Fluids

Body armor is currently created using geometry based on Kevlar fabric. This research focuses on determining how to make the design stronger and more effective by using several combinations and strength thickening fluids.

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2018 ScienceBuzz Symposium

Click Here to go to the Conference Website

We are excited to announce the first annual ScienceBuzz Symposium, dedicated to middle and high school students. The conference and registration is completely free! Currently, the symposium date is June 9, 2018.

Pre-register for the symposium by visiting the conference website or clicking here. There are a limited number of seats and we expect to fill up quickly, so register ASAP. The event will include several internationally-renowned speakers, workshop sessions, company exhibitions, scholarships, and research presentations. 

 

The 2018 ScienceBuzz Symposium is the first, completely free conference exclusively for middle and high school students. Our theme for this year is “One Day of Powerful Talks.”

It will be hosted in Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania, but will include students from around the state and nearby regions. The event will have national guest keynote speakers (including a Nobel Prize Laureate, the head of a leading scientific institution, college admissions officers, university professors, leaders in gifted education, and top biopharma executives). It will also include workshop sessions, student poster presentations, five research scholarship awards, organizational and company exhibitions, and unique networking opportunities.

To learn more about the symposium, agenda, and logistical details, visit our website at www.sciencebuzz.wixsite.com/symposium

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