Month: July 2017

Powering Wearable Microelectronics

Wearable low power biometric devices and body sensor network systems (BSNs) such as heart, respiration, and activity monitors are popular devices that are predicted to increase tenfold by 2018. This project focused on biomechanical energy harvesting from rib cage expansion using piezoelectric materials and frequency up conversion to power wearable microelectronics.

B. thetaiotaomicron in the Presence of Yogurt

The microbiome of humans contains an estimated 100 trillion microbial cells as well as an estimated quadrillion viruses. It is responsible for energy harvest, the breakdown of indigestible carbohydrates, the production of important biological molecules, and, most importantly, proper immune system development.

Methods of Reusing Food Waste

The development of an algorithm through the assessment of nutrients in a recycled food supplement for canines.

The Future of Disease Diagnosis

MIT researchers have devised a new, non-invasive technique to determine cell stiffness and thus reveal disease.

Diabetes – Under the Scalpel

Recent estimates by the International Diabetes Federation and World Health Organization suggest that currently there are 415 people around the world with the disease. This may climb to 650 million by 2040.

Creating Advanced Body Armor by Combining Web Geometry with Shear Thickening Fluids

Body armor is currently created using geometry based on Kevlar fabric. This research focuses on determining how to make the design stronger and more effective by using several combinations and strength thickening fluids.

Alzheimer’s – Prevention May Be the Answer

By 2030, more than 70 million people worldwide are expected to have Alzheimer’s, at a global cost of US $2 trillion. Yet, treatment for this disease has remained as elusive as ever.

Post-MI Cardiac Tissue Engineering

In this study, the author engineers novel gelatin-NIPAM-graphene hydrogels and new, powerful computational tools to enhance precision cardiovascular medicine. Engineering Injectable, Conductive Hydrogels doped with Graphene and Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles for Post-MI Cardiac Tissue Engineering and Robust Drug Discovery: A Computationally-Aided Investigation for Enhancing Therapeutic Efficacy

Method of Targeting Circulating Tumor Cells

Cancer metastasis accounts for 90% for all cancer-related deaths. Thus, treatment and prevention of secondary tumor formation is vital. A liposome coated with an adhesion molecule and death ligand is proposed in order to target the cancer cells in the bloodstream.

Using Adhesion Molecules to Separate Circulating Tumor Cells

Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have a characteristic identification in metastasis. In order to monitor, diagnose, and analyze early-stage non-hematologic cancers, these rare cells must be separated from the whole blood with high efficiency. Thus, a microfluidic chip coated with E-selectin and microscopic inclined three-dimensional groove and wave patterns, which increases the probability of cell contact and separates the leukocytes and CTCs even further, is created.

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