Month: September 2017

Marine Reserve Targets to Sustain and Rebuild Unregulated Fisheries Marine Reserve Targets to Sustain and Rebuild Unregulated Fisheries

Overfishing and other anthropogenic impacts threaten the sustainability of coastal marine biodiversity and ecosystem functioning worldwide [1,2]. To counter this problem, nearly 200 governments have committed to protecting 10% of all coastal and marine areas “effectively” by 2020

Lung Basal Stem Cells Rapidly Repair DNA Damage Using the Error-Prone Nonhomologous End-Joining Pathway

Human lungs are constantly exposed to inhaled environmental and chemical insults that have the potential to damage cellular DNA. Lung stem and progenitor cells must be capable of repairing their DNA to maintain healthy survival

Living Bacterial Sacrificial Porogens to Engineer Decellularized Porous Scaffolds

Porous materials are of scientific and technological interest and find broad applications in multiple areas such as storage, separation, catalytic technologies as well as emerging microelectronics and medicine

Large-Scale Bi-Level Strain Design Approaches and Mixed-Integer Programming Solution Techniques

Metabolic engineering of microbial strains has been of great interest for producing a wide variety of chemicals including biofuels, polymer precursors, and drugs. While conventional metabolic engineering approaches often focus on modifications to the desired and neighboring pathways, recent developments in computational analysis of metabolic models allow identification of genetic modifications needed to improve production of biochemicals

Laminin 211 inhibits protein kinase A in Schwann cells to modulate neuregulin 1 type III-driven myelination

Myelin is essential for rapid impulse propagation and the proper function of the nervous system. Schwann cells (SCs) form myelin in peripheral nerves in 2 subsequent steps, radial sorting of axons and myelination.

Integration of individual and social information for decision-making in groups of different sizes

When making decisions in a group, individuals can adapt their initial beliefs according to the social influence produced by the opinions of other individuals in the group. In modern society, this type of process is widespread and can be seen in settings ranging from work meetings to the courtroom.

Integrating Phylodynamics and Epidemiology to Estimate Transmission Diversity in Viral Epidemics

Mathematical epidemiology describes the spread of infectious diseases and aims to aid in the design of effective public health interventions. Central to this endeavour is the basic reproductive number (R0) of an infectious disease, the mean number of secondary infections per primary infection in a completely susceptible population

Waste Not, Want Not

Theoretically all parts of a fish could be sold and used in various ways. However we live in Cordova Alaska, a place where canneries produce hundreds of pounds of fish waste every day. This waste includes mainly the head, tail and bones of the fish, parts that the cannery cannot use. All of this gets pumped into the surrounding waters where it is consumed by various marine life, including Steller sea lions, glaucous winged gulls and halibut.

Integrating Phylodynamics and Epidemiology to Estimate Transmission Diversity in Viral Epidemics

Mathematical epidemiology describes the spread of infectious diseases and aims to aid in the design of effective public health interventions [1]–[3]. Central to this endeavour is the basic reproductive number (R0) of an infectious disease, the mean number of secondary infections per primary infection in a completely susceptible population [4] (for notations see Table 1). Under simple epidemiological scenarios, in which all infected individuals behave identically, R0depends on the transmission probability per contact with a susceptible individual, the duration of infectiousness and the rate at which new contacts are made.

Coastal Resilience to Oil Spills in Cook Inlet

Coastal resilience is important to coastal communities. Coastal resilience can be defined as the capacity for a coastal community to absorb a disturbance while at the same time undergo changes that help retain that community’s services, structures, and sense of identity. Hazards that would require coastal resilience include natural and man-made disturbances such as tsunamis, earthquakes, landslides, flooding, and oil spills.

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