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Eric Clark



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Dynamic patterning by the Drosophila pair-rule network reconciles long-germ and short-germ segmentation

Like other arthropods, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has a segmented body plan. This segmental pattern is laid down in the embryo during the first 3 hours of development.

A New Discrete Dynamic Model of ABA-Induced Stomatal Closure Predicts Key Feedback Loops

The epidermes of leaves and other aerial plant parts have natural openings known as stomata. Stomata are the entry and exit points where gas exchange, particularly CO2 uptake for photosynthesis and O2 and water vapor diffusion from the leaf interior to the atmosphere, takes place. Each stomate is surrounded by a pair of guard cells that modulate stomatal apertures in response to endogenous water status, to multiple phytohormones, and to many environmental signals such as light and CO2 [1–4].

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Dynamic patterning by the Drosophila pair-rule network reconciles long-germ and short-germ segmentation

Like other arthropods, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has a segmented body plan. This segmental pattern is laid down in the embryo during the first 3 hours of development.

A New Discrete Dynamic Model of ABA-Induced Stomatal Closure Predicts Key Feedback Loops

The epidermes of leaves and other aerial plant parts have natural openings known as stomata. Stomata are the entry and exit points where gas exchange, particularly CO2 uptake for photosynthesis and O2 and water vapor diffusion from the leaf interior to the atmosphere, takes place. Each stomate is surrounded by a pair of guard cells that modulate stomatal apertures in response to endogenous water status, to multiple phytohormones, and to many environmental signals such as light and CO2 [1–4].

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A New Discrete Dynamic Model of ABA-Induced Stomatal Closure Predicts Key Feedback Loops

The epidermes of leaves and other aerial plant parts have natural openings known as stomata. Stomata are the entry and exit points where gas exchange, particularly CO2 uptake for photosynthesis and O2 and water vapor diffusion from the leaf interior to the atmosphere, takes place. Each stomate is surrounded by a pair of guard cells that modulate stomatal apertures in response to endogenous water status, to multiple phytohormones, and to many environmental signals such as light and CO2 [1–4].

Dynamic patterning by the Drosophila pair-rule network reconciles long-germ and short-germ segmentation

Like other arthropods, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has a segmented body plan. This segmental pattern is laid down in the embryo during the first 3 hours of development.

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