Biochemistry

Neuroaesthetics and the Trouble with Beauty

The famous nineteenth-century psychophysicist Gustav Fechner was also a poet and art critic. Armed with the tools of science, Fechner sought to reconcile his various interests. He would doubtless be interested by technological developments in neuroscience that have revealed the operations of neurons at cellular resolution and have enabled us to peer almost unnoticed into each other’s working brains.

Multidrug-Resistant Gonorrhea: A Research and Development Roadmap to Discover New Medicines

Gonorrhea is among the most common sexually transmitted infections (STIs), with an estimated 78 million new cases in 2012 [1]. Countries with good surveillance have reported increases in cases of gonorrhea, such as an 11% rise between 2014 and 2015 in the United Kingdom [2], a doubling of cases among MSM (men who have sex with men) in France between 2013 and 2015 [3], a 5% rise between 2013 and 2015 in the United States [4], and an increase of 29%–146% in almost all Australian states between 2010 and 2014 [5], all reflecting longer-term trends. Decreasing condom use [6], increased urbanization and travel, poor infection detection rates, and inadequate or failed treatment [7] all contribute to this increase.

Mucin Acts as a Nutrient Source and a Signal for the Differential Expression of Genes coding for cellular processes and virulence factors in Acinetobacter baumannii

The capacity of Acinetobacter baumannii to persist and cause infections depends on its interaction with abiotic and biotic surfaces, including those found on medical devices and host mucosal surfaces. However, the extracellular stimuli affecting these interactions are poorly understood.

Microtubules in Bacteria: Ancient Tubulins Build a Five-Protofilament Homolog of the Eukaryotic Cytoskeleton

Microtubules play crucial roles in cytokinesis, transport, and motility, and are therefore superb targets for anti-cancer drugs. All tubulins evolved from a common ancestor they share with the distantly related bacterial cell division protein FtsZ, but while eukaryotic tubulins evolved into highly conserved microtubule-forming heterodimers, bacterial FtsZ presumably continued to function as single homopolymeric protofilaments as it does today

An Analysis of Arctic Coastal Resilience in Response to Erosion

The current environment of the Arctic coastline is shifting. As global climate change continues, the Arctic is growing progressively warmer, and as continental and glacial ice melts, increased water makes its way to the ocean basins, causing sea levels to rise in a form of eustasy, or long-term variation in sea levels, which accelerates erosion.

Algal Populations as an Indicator of a Shifting Arctic Ecosystem

Coastlines all around the world are subject to rising sea level. Homes, livelihoods, and industries are being washed away by ever-warming seawater. The exponential rise in greenhouse gas output contributes to an undeniable rise in worldwide temperatures and melting arctic sea ice. The sea ice model suggests a loss of multiyear ice by the year 2042.

The Comprehensive Management of Chinook Salmon in Campbell Creek Estuary

The focal point of our efforts is the Campbell Creek Estuary in Anchorage, Alaska, and the Chinook salmon within it. Campbell Creek Estuary is an ecologically diverse area in which numerous natural processes occur and serve as a bio-filter for the more populated areas of Anchorage (Municipality of Anchorage 2010).

The Impact of Tributyltin in the Cook Inlet Watershed

From the shores of England to the watersheds of Alaska, all marine environments face degradation with the exposure of tributyltin, commonly known as TBT. Since the introduction of TBT in the 1960s, boat hulls and fishing equipment have become more hydrodynamic by eliminating microbial organisms’ growth on marine equipment therefore increasing efficiency.

The Spread of Wolbachia through Mosquito Populations

In 2008, 2 groups of researchers independently reported that a bacterial symbiont called Wolbachia made Drosophila resistant to RNA viruses [1,2]. This added to a growing list of symbionts that act as an ‘accessory immune system’, protecting insects against infection. However, both groups realized that the significance of their results went beyond insect immunity and potentially provided a new way to control mosquito-borne viruses.

Ocean Acidification Effects on the Oceanic Ecosystem around Dutch Harbor

In the waters we rely on for sea food: such as King Crab (Lithodidae), Pollock (Pollachius), and pteropods (Limacina), there are many things seeking to harm, or kill these animals. What if I told you there was a silent killer on the loose, that’s getting away with doing just that.

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