Environmental Sciences

Diversifying Petersburg’s Economy: Assuring Resiliency against a Potential China Market Crash

The total proportion of Petersburg’s population that fished was 25.8% in 2013. Moreover, the estimated earnings related to fisheries in 2013 was $65.7 million. Given the importance of the seafood industry and Petersburg’s connection to the world market, we decided to look at what might happen to Petersburg if China’s market were to crash and could no longer buy our fish.

The Effects of Timber Harvest on the East Duncan Canal Estuary

The Tonka Timber Sale is planned for Kupreanof Island near Petersburg in southeast Alaska. Little study has been given to the effect of timber harvest on estuaries. We are providing an analysis of timber harvests on East Duncan Canal estuaries. The two main studies we observed are biogeochemical cycling and hydrological processes.

Rural Living and Subsistence Lifestyles and How They Impact Each Other

Our research topic is the dump and human waste contaminating our food supply. Tununak is a small village of about 350 people and is located near the Bering Sea. There are several hoppers around town, which you could locate if you simply took one stroll around.

The Road Not Taken: Could Stress-Specific Mutations Lead to Different Evolutionary Paths?

The evolutionary trajectories of organisms are paved with mutations, which generate the raw material (genetic variation) essential for evolutionary change. In biology class, we learn that mutations are random: the probability that a mutation occurs is independent of its fitness effect (i.e., its impact on individual survival or reproduction). As Luria and Delbruck famously showed [1], bacterial mutations that confer resistance to a virus continually arise in a population before exposure to the virus; under subsequent viral infection, these mutations spread in the population.

Dynactin Subunit p150Glued Is a Neuron-Specific Anti-Catastrophe Factor

Regulation of microtubule dynamics in neurons is critical, as defects in the microtubule-based transport of axonal organelles lead to neurodegenerative disease. The microtubule motor cytoplasmic dynein and its partner complex dynactin drive retrograde transport from the distal axon.

A Sustainability Plan for the Arctic with a Focus on the Role of Diatoms

Changes over the next 50 years impacting diatoms and their role in Arctic exploration and development are examined. As Arctic ice recedes, the resulting shift in diatom species composition causes a ripple effect changing the food web, and impacting the lifestyle of Arctic people.

Arctic Ice Melt and the Ivory Gull

Reduced sea ice has made a significant impact in the Arctic ecosystem. Organisms that depend on ice are particularly sensitive to the ice’s reduction. The Ivory Gull, because they are heavily dependent on the ice, could be a key indicator species to infer changes in the ice habitat.

Applying New Technologies to Manage Solid Waste and Biosolids in Juneau

Disposal of biosolids and solid waste in an environmentally positive and cost effective method has posed a serious issue for Juneau and other Southeast communities for many years. Ever since the incineration of Juneau’s solid waste and biosolids was discontinued in 2004 and 2010, respectively, effective long­term disposal has been neglected due to cost limitations.

The Effects of Sea Ice Reduction on the Subsistence of Arctic Char (Salvelinus alpinus), Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma) and Arctic Cisco (Coregonus autumnalis)

This paper explores the effects of climate change and induced sea ice retreat on arctic char, dolly varden and arctic cisco. These fishes are vital to the subsistence lifestyles of Inuit, Inupiat, and Inuvialuit communities living in the boroughs of northern Alaska and the Northwest Territories of Canada.

Clarifying the Mechanism of Superantigen Toxicity

Superantigens are bacterial proteins that generate a powerful immune response by binding to Major Histocompatibility Complex class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells and T cell receptors on T cells. A recent article reveals that at least one of the superantigens, staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), also binds the co-stimulatory molecule CD28, suggesting that a much larger and potentially more stable complex is formed at the immunological synapse than was previously thought.

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