Environmental Sciences

The Challenges That Western Alaska Faces Regarding Coastal Erosion and the Methods Needed to Combat its Long-term Effects

Coastal erosion is a huge problem for many people living on the coast; this particular problem is something nobody wants to deal with. Coastal erosion can cause major property damage, loss of valuable land, and damage to the economy. It is important to fight against this terrible predicament because property, land, and the economy are important to human nature.

RNA Mimicry by the Fap7 Adenylate Kinase in Ribosome Biogenesis

During biogenesis of the 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits, the pre-40S particles are exported to the cytoplasm prior to final cleavage of the 20S pre-rRNA to mature 18S rRNA. Amongst the factors involved in this maturation step, Fap7 is unusual, as it both interacts with ribosomal protein Rps14 and harbors adenylate kinase activity, a function not usually associated with ribonucleoprotein assembly

Biowaste to Biofuel

The inspiration for our project comes from the Millennium Project, which is a global foresight network on behalf of humanity for building a better future that informs the world of the emerging energy crisis.

Family living sets the stage for cooperative breeding and ecological resilience in birds

Cooperative breeding is an extreme form of cooperation that occurs when individuals help raise conspecific offspring that are not their own, often while temporarily foregoing their own reproduction. This common form of cooperation has intrigued evolutionary biologists since Darwin and is thought to have evolved multiple times in a range of lineages, including insects, fish, birds, and mammals, usually as a product of kin selection,

The Effects of Sea Ice Loss On Harp Seals

This paper explores how the declining rate of sea ice affects the harp seal. Prior to researching, harp seal population was anticipated to diminish due to habitat loss from warming ocean temperatures. It will start by discussing the sea ice projections for the next 50 years and how much it is predicted to decrease.

Hydrogen Sulfide Hastens New Leaf Growth

Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gas with a distinctive rotten egg smell that is widely found in the environment from volcanoes, sulfur springs, undersea vents, swamps, municipal sewers, and in crude petroleum and natural gas (1). H2S is toxic at high concentrations, but at very small amounts, it can help plants and our bodies in many ways, including the improvement of plant germination and drought resistance, protection against cardiovascular diseases, and stimulation of memory (2-9).

Use of Carbon Dioxide as a Renewable Reagent

Petroleum is heavily depended upon for energy production, the production of plastic, and the manufacturing of multiple important chemicals. Though petroleum is said to have broad areas of applications and the capacity to constantly produce a large amount of energy cheaply, it is also a nonrenewable resource that destroys our everyday environment. This project focuses on using wasted carbon dioxide as a renewable reagent to catalytically synthesize commercially useful cyclic carbonates.

Research Priorities for Harnessing Plant Microbiomes in Sustainable Agriculture

A growing appreciation of microbial diversity and function in combination with advances in omics (i.e., the study of large-scale biological datasets, including genes, transcripts, proteins and metabolites) and data analytics technologies are fueling rapid advances in microbiome research. One driving motivation—harnessing beneficial microbes and reducing impacts of detrimental microbes—is common to both humans and crop plants.

Coevolution and the Effects of Climate Change on Interacting Species

Recent studies suggest that environmental changes may tip the balance between interacting species, leading to the extinction of one or more species. While it is recognized that evolution will play a role in determining how environmental changes directly affect species, the interactions among species force us to consider the coevolutionary responses of species to environmental changes.

Ocean Acidification

Ocean acidification is the decrease of the seawater pH level. Ocean acidification effects the chemistry and biology of the oceans. Several things can be directly and indirectly affected. Our community is located near the Bering Sea. The Bering Sea could be affected by ocean acidification in many ways such as the dissolving of marine calcifier’s shells.

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