Environmental Sciences

Decreasing Arctic Sea Ice Through the Eyes of Spectacled Eiders

Arctic sea ice is decreasing due to carbon emissions and greenhouse gases, with rates of decline between 2001-2005 at 8.6%. Ice Mass Buoys have been used to gather data suggesting that the sea ice thickness is decreasing twice as fast as sea ice extent is. Models predict that sea ice is ever declining though rates vary model to model.

Tsunami and Earthquake Effects and Coastal Resilience in Palmer, Alaska

We of the Palmer High Ocean Bowl team based our research project on the concept that the Matanuska-Susitna Valley could be washed out by a tsunami of a significant size. We chose this topic because our team members are residents of the valley and wanted to investigate the effects of a tsunami on the local area and what could be done to protect our home and keep it resilient.

Rural Living and Subsistence Lifestyles and How They Impact Each Other

Our research topic is the dump and human waste contaminating our food supply. Tununak is a small village of about 350 people and is located near the Bering Sea. There are several hoppers around town, which you could locate if you simply took one stroll around.

Ocean Acidification

Ocean acidification is the decrease of the seawater pH level. Ocean acidification effects the chemistry and biology of the oceans. Several things can be directly and indirectly affected. Our community is located near the Bering Sea. The Bering Sea could be affected by ocean acidification in many ways such as the dissolving of marine calcifier’s shells.

New Insights into Unusual Genetic Disorder Pave the Way for Promising Treatments

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) may not receive as much attention as Down syndrome or other genetic diseases that affect brain development. But as its lengthy name suggests, it is a multifaceted disorder that can have wide-ranging effects on an individual’s life. TSC affects about 1 in 6,000 people, causing seizures, mental retardation, and benign tumors in the brain and other organs.

Neuroaesthetics and the Trouble with Beauty

The famous nineteenth-century psychophysicist Gustav Fechner was also a poet and art critic. Armed with the tools of science, Fechner sought to reconcile his various interests. He would doubtless be interested by technological developments in neuroscience that have revealed the operations of neurons at cellular resolution and have enabled us to peer almost unnoticed into each other’s working brains.

Multidrug-Resistant Gonorrhea: A Research and Development Roadmap to Discover New Medicines

Gonorrhea is among the most common sexually transmitted infections (STIs), with an estimated 78 million new cases in 2012 [1]. Countries with good surveillance have reported increases in cases of gonorrhea, such as an 11% rise between 2014 and 2015 in the United Kingdom [2], a doubling of cases among MSM (men who have sex with men) in France between 2013 and 2015 [3], a 5% rise between 2013 and 2015 in the United States [4], and an increase of 29%–146% in almost all Australian states between 2010 and 2014 [5], all reflecting longer-term trends. Decreasing condom use [6], increased urbanization and travel, poor infection detection rates, and inadequate or failed treatment [7] all contribute to this increase.

Mucin Acts as a Nutrient Source and a Signal for the Differential Expression of Genes coding for cellular processes and virulence factors in Acinetobacter baumannii

The capacity of Acinetobacter baumannii to persist and cause infections depends on its interaction with abiotic and biotic surfaces, including those found on medical devices and host mucosal surfaces. However, the extracellular stimuli affecting these interactions are poorly understood.

Transient Orcas: A Dying Breed

As the muscular body catapults from the water, the crowd “oohs” and “aahs,” straining against the rails to see the massive fluke slap against the waves. The stutter of camera clicks and flashes ceases, as the admirers wait anxiously for the next opportunity to record their great Alaskan adventure on film. As they continue their sightseeing, the tour guide informs the excited passengers about the killer whales, the mighty king of the seas. Each summer many vacationers migrate to Alaska to see the rugged scenery and magnificent wildlife.

Microtubules in Bacteria: Ancient Tubulins Build a Five-Protofilament Homolog of the Eukaryotic Cytoskeleton

Microtubules play crucial roles in cytokinesis, transport, and motility, and are therefore superb targets for anti-cancer drugs. All tubulins evolved from a common ancestor they share with the distantly related bacterial cell division protein FtsZ, but while eukaryotic tubulins evolved into highly conserved microtubule-forming heterodimers, bacterial FtsZ presumably continued to function as single homopolymeric protofilaments as it does today

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