Environmental Sciences

Planning for Population Growth to Manage Estuarine Wetlands

Residential development is the most important challenge facing our community and the coastal ecosystem supporting that community. The Matanuska Susitna Borough (MSB) is the fastest growing community in Alaska, with a population increase of almost 50% in the last 10 years.

Fusion of Protein Aggregates Facilitates Asymmetric Damage Segregation

Asymmetric segregation of damaged proteins at cell division generates a cell that retains damage and a clean cell that supports population survival. In cells that divide asymmetrically, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, segregation of damaged proteins is achieved by retention and active transport. We have previously shown that in the symmetrically dividing Schizosaccharomyces pombe there is a transition between symmetric and asymmetric segregation of damaged proteins.

Spontaneous mutation rate is a plastic trait associated with population density across domains of life

The probability of spontaneous genetic mutations occurring during replication evolves among organisms. This mutation rate can also vary at a particular site in a particular genotype, dependent upon the environment.

Lipids in HIV’s Envelope Help the Virus to Spread

Dendritic cells (DCs) are a type of immune cell that patrol tissues, on the lookout for microbial invaders. When DCs encounter a pathogen, they chop it up into tiny pieces and then carry samples of it to local lymph nodes. There, they display their finds to another kind of immune cell, the T cell, which then mounts a full-fledged immune response against the invader.

Fallout of Fukushima: A Monitoring Program to Preserve the Gulf of Alaska’s Economy

The Gulf of Alaska (GOA) is crucial to the Alaskan fishing, tourism, and shipping industries which are cornerstones of the Alaskan economy. Currently, the GOA is a healthy and productive ecosystem which provides invaluable cultural and commercial resources; these resources are derived from a number of aquatic fauna that spend the majority of their lifespan in the GOA region. Knowledge of this ecosystem, before the advent of any negative ecological and economical impacts as a result of the Fukushima Daiichi disaster, is essential baseline

Experimental Evidence for Phonemic Contrasts in a Nonhuman Vocal System

The ability to generate new meaning by rearranging combinations of meaningless sounds is a fundamental component of language. Although animal vocalizations often comprise combinations of meaningless acoustic elements, evidence that rearranging such combinations generates functionally distinct meaning is lacking. Here, we provide evidence for this basic ability in calls of the chestnut-crowned babbler (Pomatostomus ruficeps), a highly cooperative bird of the Australian arid zone.

Establishing Clonal Cell Lines with Endothelial-Like Potential from CD9hi, SSEA-1− Cells in Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Embryoid Bodies

Differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into specific cell types with minimal risk of teratoma formation could be efficiently directed by first reducing the differentiation potential of ESCs through the generation of clonal, self-renewing lineage-restricted stem cell lines. Efforts to isolate these stem cells are, however, mired in an impasse where the lack of purified lineage-restricted stem cells has hindered the identification of defining markers for these rare stem cells and, in turn, their isolation.

Waste Not, Want Not

Theoretically all parts of a fish could be sold and used in various ways. However we live in Cordova Alaska, a place where canneries produce hundreds of pounds of fish waste every day. This waste includes mainly the head, tail and bones of the fish, parts that the cannery cannot use. All of this gets pumped into the surrounding waters where it is consumed by various marine life, including Steller sea lions, glaucous winged gulls and halibut.

Systemic Bud Induction and Retinoic Acid Signaling Underlie Whole Body Regeneration in the Urochordate Botrylloides leachi

Some of the most fundamental issues in developmental biology concern the ability of metazoans to regenerate. In most multicellular organisms, adult stem cells maintain organs’ homeostasis throughout life and facilitate tissue repair after injury or disease [1]. Several organisms are capable of regrowing amputated organs and body parts, for example, amphibian limbs, lens, and retina.

Surviving The Salmongeddon

In Dillingham, and around the world, oceans are changing; due to these changes oceanic habitats are being affected. The changes could result in what we call the “salmongeddon”- the functional extinction of Alaska’s salmon.

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